"God created semicolons to train the faithful."

— from “The Complete Muad’Dib Style Guide” by the Princess Irulan (via muaddibstyleguide)

"It’s high operatic villainy alongside detached throwaway tongue-in-cheek; plus the ‘real menace’ and his closely guarded suitcase of pain. It’s grand and epic and majestic and poetic and lyrical and wicked and rich and badass and might possibly be the most gloriously fun part I’ve ever stared down the barrel of playing. It is just so juicy."

Tom Hiddleston, on Loki, after his read-through of the first draft of Joss Whedon’s The Avengers script. 

"Don’t make stuff because you want to make money — it will never make you enough money. And don’t make stuff because you want to get famous — because you will never feel famous enough. Make gifts for people — and work hard on making those gifts in the hope that those people will notice and like the gifts."

John Green (via this-is-dedicated)

(via austinkleon)

"The comma splice must flow. He who controls the splice controls the universe."

— "The Complete Muad’Dib Style Guide" by the Princess Irulan (via muaddibstyleguide)

genderoftheday:

genderoftheday:

Todays Genders of the day are: Toad ready to party, and Toad very excited (with his legs showing)

I am officially replacing the male/female gender binary with this. You’re either a Toad ready to party or a Toad very excited (with legs showing).

genderoftheday:

genderoftheday:

Todays Genders of the day are: Toad ready to party, and Toad very excited (with his legs showing)

I am officially replacing the male/female gender binary with this. You’re either a Toad ready to party or a Toad very excited (with legs showing).

(via little-jinx)

Oranges, by Gary Soto

The first time I walked
With a girl, I was twelve,
Cold, and weighted down
With two oranges in my jacket.
December. Frost cracking
Beneath my steps, my breath
Before me, then gone,
As I walked toward
Her house, the one whose
Porch light burned yellow
Night and day, in any weather.
A dog barked at me, until
She came out pulling
At her gloves, face bright
With rouge. I smiled,
Touched her shoulder, and led
Her down the street, across
A used car lot and a line
Of newly planted trees,
Until we were breathing
Before a drugstore. We
Entered, the tiny bell
Bringing a saleslady
Down a narrow aisle of goods.
I turned to the candies
Tiered like bleachers,
And asked what she wanted -
Light in her eyes, a smile
Starting at the corners
Of her mouth. I fingered
A nickle in my pocket,
And when she lifted a chocolate
That cost a dime,
I didn’t say anything.
I took the nickle from
My pocket, then an orange,
And set them quietly on
The counter. When I looked up,
The lady’s eyes met mine,
And held them, knowing
Very well what it was all
About.

Outside,
A few cars hissing past,
Fog hanging like old
Coats between the trees.
I took my girl’s hand
In mine for two blocks,
Then released it to let
Her unwrap the chocolate.
I peeled my orange
That was so bright against
The gray of December
That, from some distance,
Someone might have thought
I was making a fire in my hands.

Thanks to The Listserve, and Listserve-member Jillian, for sharing this poem. Just beautiful. 

I had the great pleasure, and privilege, of portraying child- and teen-aged Yehuda in the operatic adaptation of his book, The Lost Childhood, for multiple iterations during its development with American Opera Projects. Parts of that score still sometimes spring unbidden to mind - terribly haunting (and difficult!) music, it was, but an incredibly courageous and powerful story. RIP.